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Deep-Sea Expert Expresses Concern: ‘Banging’ Being Optimistic, Titanic Sub May Have Depleted Air Supply

Amidst the extensive search efforts being conducted by military and civilian fleets in the Atlantic Ocean near the coasts of New England and Canada to locate the missing OceanGate Titan submersible, people worldwide are anxiously hoping that the sounds detected on Tuesday could indicate the survival of the international crew.

However, Dr. Jeff Karson, a distinguished professor emeritus of earth and environmental sciences at Syracuse University, has expressed concerns regarding the process of triangulating the location based on the unidentified sounds picked up by search-and-rescue teams. His apprehension stems from the potential time-consuming nature of the triangulation process, which could inadvertently divert resources to a different area if the sounds turn out to be unrelated to trapped crew members banging on the submersible’s hull.

Dr. Karson emphasizes the need for caution, as he worries that there may be misleading or false sounds in the vicinity, leading the search efforts astray from the actual location that requires thorough investigation. The possibility of false leads poses a challenge in ensuring that search resources are directed appropriately to maximize the chances of locating the missing submersible and its crew.

The concern raised by Dr. Karson underscores the delicate balance between the urgency to locate the crew and the careful consideration required to avoid potential misdirection. As search teams continue their meticulous efforts, it is crucial to prioritize accuracy and verify the origin and significance of any detected sounds to minimize the risk of misallocating vital resources. The expertise and experience of experts like Dr. Karson are invaluable in guiding the search operations effectively and ensuring that the focus remains on the area that demands immediate attention.

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